Swallowing Rehabilitation Research Lab

Mar 18, 2019: We are very pleased to share that Carly Barbon successfully defended her thesis on March 18.
Her work has focused on the use of thickened liquids to address swallowing impairment in individuals who have undergone radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. 

Feb 28, 2019: The Swallowing Rehabilitation Research Lab trainees and colleagues from the Yunusova lab had the opportunity for a research masterclass with Dr. John Rosenbek.


Feb 27, 2019: We are very pleased to share that Ashley Waito successfully defended her thesis on February 27. Her research focus is on the important topic of swallowing impairment (dysphagia) in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS).  Ashley’s goal is to conduct research that will help us to better understand the nature of progressive swallowing impairments, which are debilitating in the ALS population. Ashley’s research has the potential to dramatically influence outcomes for people with this disease.

Jan 30, 2019: We are proud of our Swallowing Rehabilitation Research Lab doctoral trainees Carly Barbon and Ashley Waito who were presented with several awards at the 2019 Toronto Rehab Institute Research Day. Carly Barbon received the Focus on Accessibility Award and Geoff Fernie Impact Award. Ashley Waito received the Best Publication Award and Best PhD Poster Award. Read more here.

Jan 30, 2019: UHN unveiled a new research institute at the 2019 Toronto Rehab Institute Research Day. Toronto Rehab Research Institute is being renamed KITE (Knowledge, Innovation, Talent, Everywhere) at UHN. Toronto Rehab Research Institute is being renamed KITE (Knowledge, Innovation, Talent, Everywhere) at UHN. This change allows us to focus on the future of rehab science while remaining committed to transforming the lives of people in our community. Learn more about KITE.

Oct 8, 2015: Catriona Steele has been awarded $2.3 Million from the NIH to investigate Physiological Flow of Liquids Used in Dysphagia Management.Thickened liquids have become the most common intervention for dysphagia (swallowing impairment), yet we lack a clear understanding of how this intervention works to achieve clinical benefit. This study will provide information to guide clinicians in determining optimal levels of thickening to recommend for  patients with dysphagia. This research is highly significant because it will establish a new foundation of understanding with respect to the influence of thickened liquids on swallowing. This is essential for advancing clinical practice and setting the stage for future treatment efficacy research.

PI: Catriona M. Steele; Co-Investigators: Mark Bayley, Anthony Burns, Douglas Chepeha, Cathy Craven, Lisa Duizer (University of Guelph), Ben Hanson (University College London), Andrew Hope, Emily Plowman (University of Florida)